The Evolution of an abstract:

Snapshots, time-lapse videos, & Insights from the Abstract Catalyst artists


Austin Irving

"Abstraction has absolutely been a catalyst for me, especially within the context of the work included in this show. Making large format analog photographs is a ritual that helps me make sense of the world and, as I discovered, a way to make visible the hidden aspects of myself that would otherwise remain occluded - visual

clues into my inner landscape.

In early 2017, the power of my practice to illuminate subterranean currents of internal dissonance, and ultimately initiate self-healing, became apparent via a photographic series aptly entitled: CORNERED, which debuted in Los Angeles in 2018. I realized that these images were visual representations of body dysmorphic disorder: a corporeal prison in which I was trapped. As this revelation dawned on me, I revisited my previous work and noticed that many of my projects have not only been about investigating tensions that exist in physical environments, but also a subconscious investigation of the veiled inner friction I was experiencing but could not yet articulate."

Austin Irving

Austin Irving



Stephanie E. Kolpy

"Abstraction has the ability to get to the emotive core of a subject matter. In my process of building a composition, it's the act of creating the intricate areas of abstraction that give me time to reflect and meditate on what the work is about. I find these passages of abstraction happen in a cathartic and spontaneous focus on detail with in and around the recognizable forms. At its best, this abstraction that happens in my process of creating becomes the unity of the visual forms and adds the emotive quality to the visual language of my work."

Stephanie E. Kolpy

The recognizable elements I begin with are almost expected or predictable, but the abstraction of these elements and their atmosphere is unpredictable to even me, never planned. Yet these abstract passages really become the catalyst for emotion, movement and the visual language that is undefinable.

I think for me, abstraction makes the invisible more visible but makes the undefinable through any other language visible as well." Stephanie E. Kolpy


Christian Hires

Timelapse window (above) into the work of Abstract Catalyst artist, Christian Hires.

And Christian Hires at work...


Christian Hires


Walter Jakubowski

"Having always been fascinated with life’s mysteries that often lie outside of our culture’s established norms, I find that abstraction departs from the prosaic to challenge our perceptions of our everyday world. My passion is to create images that to me are compelling, both emotionally and visually, endeavoring to provide a portal for transmuting the temporal to the empyreal.